August 2008


THE LITERAL TRUTH

When we were in Maine, I learned the literal truth of two common phrases:  “I walked my b– off” and “biting off more than you can chew.”

The latter phrase really happened when I was eating an apple.

The former phrase kinda happened.  A common lament from a certain person (that would be me) on this trip was, “I thought I was going to GAIN weight on this vacation!”  Instead, I lost 2 pounds, in spite of enjoying good eating such as ice cream almost everyday.

Here are directions for visiting Acadia National Park:

1.     Buy a book called Easy Hikes of Acadia National Park.

2.     Choose Easy Hike # 13 (of 15), which allows you to huff and puff up a boulder-stepped trail.

3.     At the top of the mountain, see a trail going down the other side, and say to oneself, “Gee, we don’t know where that trail goes, how long it is, or what its difficulty rating might be, but let’s take it anyway!”

4. Proceed to climb almost straight down a boulder-laden mountain side.

Later, a ranger taught that because of the glaciers, southern sides of Acadia mountains are much steeper. Well, we already had THAT figured out!

There was a point where I thought I would have to be rescued by park rangers, but that seemed to be too very much embarrassing.  After a few deep breaths, my son talked me down out of that one. For some reason, I don’t have a photo of THAT spot.

You know what I always say about situations like that:  MAKING MEMORIES…

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THE LITERAL TRUTH

When we were in Maine, I learned the literal truth of two common phrases:  “I walked my b– off” and “biting off more than you can chew.”

The latter phrase really happened when I was eating an apple.

The former phrase kinda happened.  A common lament from a certain person (that would be me) on this trip was, “I thought I was going to GAIN weight on this vacation!”  Instead, I lost 2 pounds, in spite of enjoying good eating such as ice cream almost everyday.

Here are directions for visiting Acadia National Park:

1.     Buy a book called Easy Hikes of Acadia National Park.

2.     Choose Easy Hike # 13 (of 15), which allows you to huff and puff up a boulder-stepped trail.

3.     At the top of the mountain, see a trail going down the other side, and say to oneself, “Gee, we don’t know where that trail goes, how long it is, or what its difficulty rating might be, but let’s take it anyway!”

4. Proceed to climb almost straight down a boulder-laden mountain side.

Later, a ranger taught that because of the glaciers, southern sides of Acadia mountains are much steeper. Well, we already had THAT figured out!

There was a point where I thought I would have to be rescued by park rangers, but that seemed to be too very much embarrassing.  After a few deep breaths, my son talked me down out of that one. For some reason, I don’t have a photo of THAT spot.

You know what I always say about situations like that:  MAKING MEMORIES…


A DIFFERENT WAY TO WALK

I saw a lot of people last week just stomping along the trail as fast as they could go, with their eyes on their footing, which had to be done.  Maybe they think of hiking as a physical task alone.

But I am a slow hiker-a stroller, really.  It’s an emotional and spiritual experience as well.  Here are some things I relished:

Bluebead lily

A pier at Bar Harbor

In the town of Bar Harbor

Bunchberry Dogwood

A DIFFERENT WAY TO WALK

I saw a lot of people last week just stomping along the trail as fast as they could go, with their eyes on their footing, which had to be done.  Maybe they think of hiking as a physical task alone.

But I am a slow hiker—a stroller, really.  It’s an emotional and spiritual experience as well.  Here are some things I relished:

Bluebead lily


A pier at Bar Harbor



In the town of Bar Harbor


Bunchberry Dogwood